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Dear woman, here is your son Here is your mother
03/22/2015
Scripture: John 19:25-27; Genesis 3:13-15; John 2:1...
Track 4 of in the series
Running time: 18 minutes, 18 seconds.
The third word from the cross is a very touching scene but when you really think about it, it is also sort of a mystery. Mary, Jesus mother is one of the most important characters in the Gospel but when you really think about her and what the Bible actually records of her life, one could conclude that she was a minor player in the Gospel accounts. What is even more astounding is what Jesus has to say about her. But there is a lot more to the story about Mary than most Christians understand. The cross and her presence at the cross on that special Friday afternoon reveals a lot about her and her relationship with Jesus, the Christ, her son.



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Mike Nobis Speaker: Mike Nobis
Sunday School Teacher, Former Elder at Madison Park Christian Church. Mike is President of JK Creative Printers & Mailing in Quincy, IL. He is married to Pam and has three children, Tom, Tyler and Jennifer. Mike has three grandchildren: Ryne, Ivy and Alicia.

View all sermons by this speaker.


Death on a Friday Afternoon
“Dear woman, here is your son… “Here is your mother.”

The third word from the cross is a very touching scene but when you really think about it, it is also sort of a mystery. Mary, Jesus mother is one of the most important characters in the Gospel but when you really think about her and what the Bible actually records of her life, one could conclude that she was a minor player in the Gospel accounts. What is even more astounding is what Jesus has to say about her. But there is a lot more to the story about Mary than most Christians understand. The cross and her presence at the cross on that special Friday afternoon reveals a lot about her and her relationship with Jesus, the Christ, her son.

What do we know about Mary, Jesus’ mother? What do we know about her relationship with her husband, her parents, with her son? What kind of relationship did she have with her other kids?

In fact, when you look into the Gospels, Mary is only mentioned a few times and there is very little recorded about her words. Only a few times do we read where she says anything. But even through the silence about her life, there is a lot we can know about her especially the relationship between her and her son. The third word from the cross speaks volumes about their relationship.

What would you say is the hardest thing for a mother to do in her relationship with her children? Someone describe for me what the empty nest is all about? Have any of you experienced that? For some mothers that is a very difficult time, why?

In the Gospel accounts we see a process going on in Mary’s life, a very difficult process. It was a process of surrendering her Son over to the ministry he was called to do and the surrender to the destiny that awaited Jesus. The Gospel accounts record the little steps that Mary went through in her surrender of her son to the world and the glory of the hour Jesus was destined to meet. The Gospels don’t record if she actually knew what was going to happen. It is no where recorded that Mary and Jesus ever had that conversation one on one during any of the hours they spent together as a family. But like any good and loving mother, she probably knew in her heart the burden Jesus was to bare all for the Glory of his father.

John 19:25-27 Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to his mother, “Dear woman, here is your son,” and to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” From that time on, this disciple took her into his home.

Describe for me the scene here as John describes it in verses 25-27. What do you think is going on in Mary’s mind as she watched her son being beaten, mocked and then hanging there, dying on a cross? Was this something she expected for her son? What understanding of this do you think she had?

Genesis 3:13-15 Then the LORD God said to the woman, “What is this you have done?” The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.” So the LORD God said to the serpent, “Because you have done this, “Cursed are you above all the livestock and all the wild animals! You will crawl on your belly and you will eat dust all the days of your life. And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring£ and hers; he will crush£ your head, and you will strike his heel.”

We don’t know exactly what Mary knew about all of this. I doubt she ever expected to be the woman in Genesis 3. But there were clues all throughout Jesus early life that gave Mary hints that Jesus was someone special. There are a number of accounts mentioned in the Gospels that give us glimpses that Mary knew something. It is hard to know what she did with them but they were hints that she took to heart. The shepherds, Simeon, Prophetess Anna, The Magi, 12 years old.

There is no question in my mind that Jesus and Mary were close. But their relationship was a strange one. There was a strange distance between them, more on the part of Jesus than Mary. From what we know about Jesus ministry, it seems as though Mary traveled a lot of the time with Jesus. There were also times when his brothers and sisters were with him. There are a number of places where the Gospel writers specifically call this to our attention.

Wedding at Cana – John 2:1-5 On the third day a wedding took place at Cana in Galilee. Jesus’ mother was there, and Jesus and his disciples had also been invited to the wedding. When the wine was gone, Jesus’ mother said to him, “They have no more wine.” “O woman, why do you involve me?” Jesus replied. “My time has not yet come. ”His mother said to the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.”

I think it is very interesting that it is here where the last recorded words of Mary are recorded. Beyond this point, we never hear her words again. But it is fitting what they are, “Do whatever he tells you”. But it must have been a strange sense that Jesus didn’t address his mother as Mom. He say “O woman”. In Cana Mary is learning what all mothers must learn, there is a time to let go. We don’t know if these words hurt her but they were the beginning of other events.

From what we know in the scriptures, who was Jesus first disciple?

It is interesting that most Christians will say Andrew or his brother Peter or even John. But in all reality, the true first disciple, the one who is always forgotten was his mother, Mary. I think what Jesus says to Mary in Luke 2 is astounding. What a thing for a 12 year old boy to say to his mother after he had been missing for three days. Mom’s what would you be doing if your child of 12 was missing for three days and you had no clue where he was? What would your reaction be if he said to you what Jesus said to Mary?

“O woman, why do you involve me?”
“Why were you searching for me?”

The “hour” is coming for Jesus. It is an hour that he alone has to deal with. It is an hour that his mother also knows is coming but she can’t save him from it. It is an hour that Jesus alone must deal with; all she will be able to do is watch.

Teaching in Galilee – Matthew 12:47-50 While Jesus was still talking to the crowd, his mother and brothers stood outside, wanting to speak to him. Someone told him, “Your mother and brothers are standing outside, wanting to speak to you.” He replied to him, “Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?” Pointing to his disciples, he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.”

Jesus had been teaching from town to town in Galilee and the Gospel accounts record how tired, weary and constantly pressed upon by the crowds Jesus was. Mothers worry when they see their children stressed and under pressure no matter how old they are. Mary would have been no different.

How would you characterize Jesus as a son here in these verses? Do you wonder what Mary thought and did she get to see Jesus that day? Did she go away disappointed and did she ponder that in her heart?

“O woman, why do you involve me?”
“Why were you searching for me?”
“Who is my mother, and who are my brothers?”

While Teaching – Luke 11:27-28 As Jesus was saying these things, a woman in the crowd called out, “Blessed is the mother who gave you birth and nursed you.” He replied, “Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and obey it.”

In Luke 8, it is recorded of the holy women who took care of Jesus as he and his disciples traveled. Their names were Mary Magdalene, Joanna and Susanna. It is interesting who is missing from that list, his mother.

At the cross, Mary and John are standing next to each other. Jesus looks down and sees his mother standing there probably thinking back to all that was in her heart about her son. The last time it was recorded that Jesus said anything to his mother was back in Cana when she asked him to solve a problem after the wine ran out.

He said to his mother, “Dear woman, here is your son,” and to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” From that time on, this disciple took her into his home.

At the cross, there was nothing left for her to do than to just be there. What was Mary thinking then? Historians believe that the cross was probably only about 7 feet tall. The concept of the cross being tall and the victim looking down on those watching comes from paintings during the Middle Ages. In all likelihood, Jesus and Mary were probably face to face when he spoke these words to her and John.

Mary is last heard of in Acts 1 when the disciples were gathered together as they continued to meet and pray together. Mary was amongst them. It probably wasn’t until Pentecost that she realized what Jesus was saying back on that day when he said, “Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.” It was not an insensitive statement made by a busy son, it was real truth that became possible by what Jesus did for us on the cross.