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The Last Days of the Old World
08/03/2014
Scripture: Genesis 7:6-16;1 Peter 3:18-21; Romans 2...
Track 12 of in the series
Running time: 54 minutes, 50 seconds.
Genesis 7:8 marks the beginning of the end for the old world that God created. For 120 years Noah followed God in all that He commanded and received the promise by God that he, his wife and his three sons with their wives would be saved from the destruction to come. It is at this point that the author pauses to mark the solemnness of the occasion. He does it by denoting Noahs age. At 600 years old, the flood came upon the earth.



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Mike Nobis Speaker: Mike Nobis
Sunday School Teacher, Former Elder at Madison Park Christian Church. Mike is President of JK Creative Printers & Mailing in Quincy, IL. He is married to Pam and has three children, Tom, Tyler and Jennifer. Mike has three grandchildren: Ryne, Ivy and Alicia.

View all sermons by this speaker.


The Last Days of the Old World

Genesis 7:8 marks the beginning of the end for the old world that God created. For 120 years Noah followed God in all that He commanded and received the promise by God that he, his wife and his three sons with their wives would be saved from the destruction to come. It is at this point that the author pauses to mark the solemnness of the occasion. He does it by denoting Noah’s age. At 600 years old, the flood came upon the earth.

The flood had not yet come but God had Noah and his family along with all the animals board the Ark. Then it was finished, the time for judgment had come. No longer could God allow man to continue to live upon the earth without a change. Wickedness had become uncontrollable so God took action.

Genesis 7:6-12 (NIV) Noah was six hundred years old when the floodwaters came on the earth. And Noah and his sons and his wife and his sons' wives entered the ark to escape the waters of the flood. Pairs of clean and unclean animals, of birds and of all creatures that move along the ground, male and female, came to Noah and entered the ark, as God had commanded Noah. And after the seven days the floodwaters came on the earth. In the six hundredth year of Noah's life, on the seventeenth day of the second month--on that day all the springs of the great deep burst forth, and the floodgates of the heavens were opened. And rain fell on the earth forty days and forty nights.

I find it interesting that the author needed to make a point that God is faithful to his promises. When God enters into a covenant relationship with man, as he did with Noah, we can rest knowing that God always keeps his promises. Again, the author revisits the fact that Noah and his family with the animals entered the ark. Everything pertaining to the Ark went as God planned because Noah was a covenant partner with God and did his part just as God commanded.

What lesson can we learn about what is written here in these verses concerning our relationship with God? When we are faithful to our terms molded together with God’s promises, God’s will moves forward in full force.

What happens when we don’t remain faithful to our part of the covenant? Does God move ahead without us or can his timeline be slowed down, things have to wait? Can our lack of faith affect God’s plans?

The date of the flood is given: 2nd month, 17th day. This date is hard to be exact as to when exactly the day of the flood came. I am not sure if it was meant for us to know but it is interesting to read what some of the scholars think about why this date and time was given. The Jewish civil year began in the fall as did most all ancient calendars. Most believe it was due to the harvest period. The Jews had attempted to base their calendar on the date of Creation. If true, the flood came 1,655 years, 1 month and 17 days after the Creation.

What problems do you think we have to overcome or assume to believe this date is actually the date of the flood? To have such an accurate date:

• One assumption we have to make is that every named son listed in chapter 5 was born on the exact named birthday of his father. This seems pretty unreasonable to believe.

I don’t necessarily believe that the writers wanted you and me to know when the actual date of the flood took place. Back then, they knew but for us it is important that we understand that the Day came when grace ended and judgment came upon mankind. The day was promised by God and it happened just like he said.

Romans 2:5 (NIV) But because of your stubbornness and your unrepentant heart, you are storing up wrath against yourself for the day of God's wrath, when his righteous judgment will be revealed.

We have many passages in the New Testament talking about another day coming. For those who are children of God, that day will be a glorious day, something we are looking forward to. But for those against God, like those during the days of Noah, that day will be a day of wrath. A terrible day. There is a date set for that day. We don’t know what it is but we can be certain that the day is set and established by God when grace will cease and the moment of judgment arrives.

Luke 13:26-30 (NIV) "Then you will say, 'We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets.' "But he will reply, 'I don't know you or where you come from. Away from me, all you evildoers!' "There will be weeping there, and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, but you yourselves thrown out. People will come from east and west and north and south, and will take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God. Indeed there are those who are last who will be first, and first who will be last."

If there was a Noah today building a spaceship because God told him to build it to rescue man from the destruction to come, how many would take him seriously? Would you take him seriously or would you write him off as a kook? How much time would you consider his warning?

Genesis 7:11b-12 on that day all the springs of the great deep burst forth, and the floodgates of the heavens were opened. And rain fell on the earth forty days and forty nights.

I bet once all the rain started and all the water started to fill up the earth, the people probably thought back to Noah and his boat. Maybe he wasn’t so kooky after all. How many of you would go back and see if Noah would let you onto the Ark?

When refused by Noah, or Noah just didn’t answer the door as you pounded on it, how many of you would be mad at Noah for not helping? How many would say it wasn’t fair? How many would blame God and curse him for not helping? Whose fault is it?

There are many theories by Christians on how God exactly created the flood. They range wildly but the best explanation is a simple one, read the passage and understand it just as it is written. When God created the earth and all the elements that make it up, everything follows a set of laws and principles created and established by God. God is specific on how the flood came about and the destruction that followed.

First: The fountains of the deep opened. This was the initial action that most scientist and scholars believe triggered what followed. Underneath the ground in the earth were vast conduits of liquid. We know that at our core is super-hot thermal activity. Today we have ample evidence from the earth’s crust and much deeper that intense igneous, metamorphic and tectonic activity happened way in the past as we see happening today still. Hot gases, blasting hot water plus magma rise in explosive ways when volcanos explode. Once the earth cracks, it can cause others to do the same.

Second: The rains fall from heaven.

In order for rain to fall, what is required?
• Atmosphere becomes unstable due to rising heat.
• When the ground warms up moisture evaporates and rises
• The warm ground also heats the air above it
• As the water vapor rises it begins to cool and condenses into clouds
• Which eventually leads to rain

Add this scenario, massive moisture is released from within the depths of the earth along with the intense heat and pressure exploded into the atmosphere from the eruptions on the earth. The particles and immense evaporation due to the intense heat from the earth are literally injected into a heavy cool water canopy that surrounds the entire planet. When those two forces of nature are brought together, the massive rain flow that will fall back to the earth will be massive. Not only did it rain for 40 days and nights, the fountains of the deep were simultaneously erupting blowing more and more particles, heat and moisture back into the atmosphere. There would be nowhere to run or hide.

What could survive such a tremendous catastrophic event? Nothing would survive. However, again the writer states the same fact over again in verse 13-16. God kept his promise as so did Noah. Together God’s plan played out to the benefit of God and the benefit of Noah.

Genesis 7:13-16 (NIV) On that very day Noah and his sons, Shem, Ham and Japheth, together with his wife and the wives of his three sons, entered the ark. They had with them every wild animal according to its kind, all livestock according to their kinds, every creature that moves along the ground according to its kind and every bird according to its kind, everything with wings. Pairs of all creatures that have the breath of life in them came to Noah and entered the ark. The animals going in were male and female of every living thing, as God had commanded Noah. Then the LORD shut him in.

It doesn’t say how God closed the door. God was the one who secured the safety of Noah’s family. The final security was not accomplished with human hands, but by the hands of God. In the Ark the old world was now dead to Noah and the rest of mankind. As the waters continued to rise destroying all life, Noah and his family was lifted beyond the judgment that existed below. Yet, even though the flood waters were waters of death and destruction, they were also waters of cleansing and deliverance. Here we see the first “like figure” to the concept of baptism. Peter used this “likeness” when he wrote:

1 Peter 3:18-21 (NIV) For Christ died for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive by the Spirit, through whom also he went and preached to the spirits in prison who disobeyed long ago when God waited patiently in the days of Noah while the ark was being built. In it only a few people, eight in all, were saved through water, and this water symbolizes baptism that now saves you also--not the removal of dirt from the body but the pledge of a good conscience toward God. It saves you by the resurrection of Jesus Christ,

If the flood was not for real, if it didn’t not happen and is only a legend, then what happens to the fact Peter writes about here? What happens to our baptism which leads us into salvation? If Noah’s escape from judgment through water, burying and leaving the old world of evil to find a new life is just a story, then what about what our baptism represents?